Recent Research Papers In Medical Microbiology Course

When the past is being compared to the present, one assumes a progress unintentionally, which of course includes our society as well. Unfortunately, there are a few cases that don't follow this rule and retrogress instead which also involves Microbiology. Once we closely observe the outcomes, we realize the expectations of the founders of Microbiology have not been met and the results of our development should have been obvious when we claim progression.

Why wouldn't we have people like Dr. Mir Shamsi, Dr. Farajollah Shafa, Dr. Bahmanyar anymore? Why are medicine students not as enthusiastic as before to participate in class? And finally, why do the institutes which once used to be the vaccine manufacturers in the Middle East, import them now and not only stopped making new vaccines, their previous products have been banned by international organizations?

Once we contemplate what has been going on, we find out that the answer to all these questions is nothing but our own mistakes which strays from the path that the pioneers had shown us. While they fervently thought of progression in this major, we only considered our ephemeral and superficial development. They spent their life time to improve Microbiology and eventually national health. The students used to take two credits of Clinical Microbiology (in the hospital lab) at medicine school which unfortunately this vital course was cancelled by irresponsible planners and we were only on-lookers. There used to be a Clinical Microbiology department, adjacent to every Microbiology department which admitted patients who were referred by physicians not only to diagnose their conditions, but also to educate medicine students as they personally asked for the patient's history and took the samples, prepared and submitted the results to the patient under the professors' supervision. All these centers except the Health Department were closed down and no Microbiologist ever objected. How come the students who never took a course in Clinical Microbiology and had no contact with the patients are teaching what they don't have any knowledge of as a university professor, and how can we expect a physician to interpret the results of the urine cultures? When the curricular are the same as high school, how do we expect the students to participate eagerly in the classes? Is it not retrogression? Can we as Microbiology experts exonerate ourselves where we confirmed these wrongs plans with our silence?

What's done is done and we need to find a solution for future, for those smart and talented university applicants who choose to study Microbiology, unaware of its destiny. A solution needs to be found for them so that they would not join the current unemployed Microbiology graduates. Unfortunately, those who are responsible make new rules which instead of support and amelioration of the curriculum prohibit their employment. This doesn't only hurt the graduates, but also hurts the society who has paid for their education and cannot benefit from their knowledge and skill.

Giving priority to research and publications over education to promote the professors is another plan which has caused decline in Microbiology and other majors as well. Based on these criteria, the professors focus on research and publishing papers which unfortunately has no health or medical significance. Education comes second especially in graduate studies, they forget its importance and what used to be teacher-student education has become student-student education. What has one who has graduated from this system learned to teach it to new students as a professor-to-be or to run an institute? This is the result of what we have gained due to the abovementioned points that when studied cautiously and sympathetically means retrogression in comparison to the past and the global improvements especially in molecular field.

M M & I 301 — PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY

2 credits.

Lectures on medically important bacteria, emphasizing the process of pathogenesis and host/parasite interactions, as well as intervention strategies, immunity and genetics as they apply to the pathogens. Open to non-majors.

M M & I 302 — MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

3 credits.

Lab covering procedures and aseptic techniques for isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, and viruses).

M M & I 341 — IMMUNOLOGY

3 credits.

Lecture, discussion. An introduction to the immune response to infectious disease. Examines the role of the host in host-parasite relationships using select microbial agents or antigens to illustrate the nonspecific and specific mechanisms of host defenses. Includes study of the nonspecific inflammatory response, the nature of microbial antigens, current concepts of antibody and cell-mediated immune reactions to infectious agents and the principles underlying the development of vaccines.

M M & I/​ENTOM/​PATH-BIO/​ZOOLOGY  350 — PARASITOLOGY

3 credits.

The biology of water-borne, food-borne, soil-borne and vector-borne parasites of animals including humans. Parasites are explored in the context of transmission, associated disease, diagnosis and treatment options, and environmental, cultural and socioeconomic drivers of disease epidemiology.

M M & I/​PATH-BIO/​ZOOLOGY  351 — PARASITOLOGY LABORATORY

2 credits.

Optional laboratory component of Zoology/Med Micro/AHABS 350. Emphasis on experiments involving live animal parasites, including: trematodes, tapeworms, gapeworms, hookworm, ascarids, trichina, filaria, trypanosomes, coccidia, and malaria.

M M & I 410 — MEDICAL MYCOLOGY

2 credits.

Lectures and discussions. Pathogenesis, molecular biology, host-parasite interactions, immunology, epidemiology, and diagnosis of systemic, subcutaneous, and superficial fungal infections.

M M & I 412 — MEDICAL MYCOLOGY LABORATORY

1 credit.

Laboratories and discussions on the ecology, sample collection, culture techniques and identification of medically important mycotic microorganisms. This is a companion lab to MMI 410. Priority given to MMI majors.

M M & I 460 — TECHNIQUES IN DNA SCIENCE FOR MICROBIOLOGISTS

3 credits.

Introduction to recombinant DNA techniques commonly used in prokaryotic research and clinical Microbiology laboratories. Topics include DNA isolation, agarose gel electrophoresis, restriction enzyme digestion of DNA, ligation, transformation, Southern blotting and PCR. Students are required to work independently.

M M & I/​MICROBIO/​PATH-BIO  528 — IMMUNOLOGY

3 credits.

Development and functions of immune response in animals; a comprehensive study of experimental humoral and cellular immunity.

M M & I/​PATH-BIO  529 — IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY

2 credits.

Selected techniques illustrating concepts of cellular and humoral immunity as a supplement to Immunology 528. Jr or Sr st; cons inst

M M & I 554 — EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND BIOTERRORISM

2 credits.

Identification of analysis and solution of emerging infectious disease problems and the problems of bioterrorism.

M M & I 555 — VACCINES: PRACTICAL ISSUES FOR A GLOBAL SOCIETY

3 credits.

Considers innovative approaches to the development and use of vaccines in the past, today and in the future, including the public health impact and the economic, ethical and safety issues associated with vaccine development, licensing and use.

M M & I/​BIOCHEM  575 — BIOLOGY OF VIRUSES

2 credits.

Lecture-discussion. Broad coverage of animal virology taught at molecular level. Topics include virus structure, viral replication/lifecycle, aspects of pathogenesis and prevention.

M M & I/​POP HLTH  603 — CLINICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH MICROBIOLOGY

5 credits.

Lecture-seminar sessions. Lectures (44) describe microorganisms of clinical and public health significance. Seminar sessions (14) discuss issues and controversies of specimen receiving and processing, bacteremia, serodiagnosis of infectious agents, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, laboratory management, and novel approaches to detect infectious agents.

M M & I/​BOTANY/​GENETICS/​MICROBIO/​PL PATH  655 — BIOLOGY AND GENETICS OF FUNGI

3 credits.

Fungal genetics, genomics, and physiology using plant pathogenic fungi and the genetic models Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa as model systems to explore the current knowledge of fungal genetics and plant/fungal interactions. Enrollment open to graduate students, but undergraduates welcome to contact instructor for permission. All students should have some prior coursework in genetics (such as GENETICS 466 or 467) and microbiology (such as MICROBIO 303). It is also recommended that students take PL PATH 300332 prior to this course.

M M & I 677 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

1-3 credits.

Lectures on a specialized topic of current interest in medical microbiology. Course content will vary with instructor.

M M & I 691 — FIRST SEMESTER SENIOR THESIS

3 credits.

First semester independent study with the goal to do the preliminary research to write a senior thesis in Medical Microbiology Immunology.

M M & I 692 — SECOND SEMESTER SENIOR THESIS

3 credits.

Second semester independent study with the goal to complete a senior thesis in Medical Microbiology Immunology.

M M & I 696 — CRITICAL THINKING IN MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNIOLOGY

3 credits.

Students will present assigned research papers from journals for critical evaluation by the class. In addition, students will write critiques of each paper evaluating the paper's introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections.

M M & I 699 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-3 credits.

M M & I 701 — INFECTION AND IMMUNITY I

4 credits.

Part I of an integrated course of basic microbiology, immunology, and infectious diseases; includes bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, basic and clinical immunology.

M M & I 704 — INFECTIOUS DISEASES OF HUMAN BEINGS

3 credits.

Pathogenesis, clinical descriptions, and prevention. Primarily for Physician Assistant, Pharmacy, and Nursing students.

M M & I/​PATH-BIO  720 — ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY: CRITICAL THINKING

3 credits.

Advanced course focusing on current questions in immunological research. Course explores immunology topics including genetic, cellular, and molecular features of immune system fundamental to regulation of immune responses. Course format: discussion of research articles and exposure to research seminars.

M M & I/​MICROBIO  740 — MECHANISMS OF MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS

3 credits.

Lecture-discussion. Host-pathogen relationships in microbial diseases. Entry level course for infectious diseases sequence (see Med Micro 760, 790).

M M & I/​PATH-BIO  750 — HOST-PARASITE RELATIONSHIPS IN VERTEBRATE VIRAL DISEASE

3 credits.

Lecture. Detailed study of the pathogenesis of vertebrate viral disease, stressing viral invasion, dissemination, mechanisms of disease production and resistance, and transmission.

M M & I/​MED SC-M  755 — FOUNDATIONS OF MEDICINE 2

3 credits.

Addresses the basic principles of medical microbiology and the infectious diseases involving the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and dermatologic systems and related any-microbial therapies.

M M & I/​PATH-BIO  773 — EUKARYOTIC MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS

3 credits.

An advanced course focusing on the molecular, cellular and biochemical mechanisms found in fungal and protozoan pathogens of humans. A combination of lectures and student presentations will be employed. MMI 740 PATH 750 recommended

M M & I/​MICROBIO/​PATH-BIO  790 — IMMUNOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE

3 credits.

Immunobiology and immunogenetics of resistance to infectious disease agents of man and animals; immunoregulatory mechanisms associated with evasion of host immunity.

M M & I 900 — JOURNAL CLUB

1 credit.

M M & I 901 — SEMINAR

1 credit.

M M & I/​BIOCHEM/​BMOLCHEM/​MICROBIO  914 — SEMINAR-MOLECULAR BIOSCIENCES (ADVANCED)

1 credit.

During the fall semester, molecular biosciences trainees who have not achieved dissertator status will present seminars based primarily on literature related to their projects. During the spring semester, molecular biosciences trainees with dissertator status will present seminars based upon their own research.

M M & I 990 — RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-12 credits.

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